What you need to know about the Department of Education’s proposed budget for 2018

In a memo issued Wednesday, the department announced that the 2017-2018 budget would be reduced by $300 million in 2018-2019, a move that will save $5 million on the state budget and $1 million on public school funding.

The memo, dated April 26, also outlines the proposed cuts to education and local government, which includes eliminating a proposed $50 million cut in local funding for the city of Detroit and $35 million in cuts to the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.

Michigan’s budget for the 2018-19 fiscal year is $8.9 billion.

State Treasurer David Orr is the only Republican to vote against the proposed reductions, which are also included in the memo.

State Sen. Chris Shays, D-Detroit, was among several Republicans who voted against the proposal.

He said the budget cuts should be used to cut the budget of the city and not to make up for cuts elsewhere in the state.

“They’re going to have to take a hard look at what they’re doing with local government,” Shays said.

“We’re losing out on $7.5 billion a year.

That’s a huge amount of money.”

The memo states that the state will save about $1.5 million per year on the education level.

This is because of reductions in state funding for education and the state’s cuts in education funding to local governments.

“The proposed reductions to local education funding are necessary to keep the state in a position where we can provide needed education services,” the memo said.

The proposed cuts are a blow to education funding across the state, which has already been impacted by the state losing $1 billion a month in federal funding.

In addition to the cuts to local funding, the memo also recommends that Michigan cut $1 for every $1 it spends on education.

The state will also have to eliminate $1,000 a day in state education funding, which could result in a loss of $1 in state school funding over the next two years, the letter said.

Michigan Governor Rick Snyder has said that the budget is not in jeopardy, but that he needs to consult with the state Senate and Assembly before making the cuts.

Gov.

Snyder said in a statement that he would work with the Legislature and Governor Orr to make adjustments to the proposed budget.

Snyder said the state is “reviewing our state budget, including the proposed state budget cut for local government and public schools, and the proposed State Department of Transportation budget to determine what additional revenue is needed to meet the funding needs of our public schools and communities.”

Gov.

Orr said that he was “deeply disappointed” by the memo, but he said the governor will meet with the Senate and the Assembly to determine how to respond to the memo before making a decision.