How do you know if your kids have good school? A new study

Posted by Newsbusters reporter Tara Westover on November 11, 2017 08:39:18In a new study, published by The New York Times, researchers found that children from homes with fewer children in the home have a much higher chance of graduating from high school, compared to homes with more children.

The study also found that the odds of graduating are higher in households with two parents with higher education.

The Times says the study is the first to use data from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics.

In 2016, more than half of all public high schools nationwide were located in households where one parent held a bachelor’s degree.

A total of 1.4 million children lived in households headed by someone with a bachelor or higher degree, according to data from 2011.

About 9.5 million children had parents with a college degree, the most recent data available from the Department of Labor.

Researchers say the new study is likely a statistical fluke, though they have no way to test the hypothesis.

“The paper makes a big claim and a lot of people will take it at face value,” said Emily Oster, a senior research scientist at the American Council on Education, which sponsored the study.

Oster is a member of the team of researchers who collected data for the study and who wrote a paper for the Journal of Education Policy.

But Oster said the results have merit.

Her team studied about 4,000 children who lived in 1,500 families in 2011.

They looked at the families’ educational attainment, parental education, and whether parents had more than one degree.

They found that a higher percentage of children from families with two or more adults with a high school diploma or less than a high-school diploma had a high graduation rate.

Their analysis also found a higher graduation rate among children who were homeschooled than homeschoolers, with about 40 percent of homeschooling children having a higher chance.

Overall, Oster’s team found that families with more than two adults with at least a bachelor degree had a higher overall graduation rate than families with fewer adults with college degrees.

That higher graduation chance was most pronounced among children from two-parent families, whose parents held a high level of education, Oter said.

It also showed that households with a single parent with a master’s degree or less were less likely to have a high overall graduation chance than households with at most two adults holding at least one degree, Oester said.