Trump to unveil his tax plan on Friday

Trump on Friday is expected to unveil a new tax plan that he says will help spur economic growth, reduce the federal deficit and improve education.

In his address to Congress, Trump will outline a plan to boost the nation’s gross domestic product, which is the value of goods and services produced by the economy.

The goal of the plan, he will say, is to grow the economy by 2 percent a year, the fastest growth rate since 1949.

It is a plan that has attracted the support of many Democrats, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont.

Trump’s economic plans would be one of his first major legislative initiatives since he took office in January.

His administration is struggling to find ways to meet his campaign promise to raise the nation “by trillions of dollars” by the end of his presidency.

A Trump administration official said the tax plan will “put the American people first,” a reference to his campaign slogan of “Make America Great Again.”

It would eliminate the estate tax, which was a major source of revenue for many Republicans during the 2016 presidential campaign.

It would also slash taxes on businesses and households that make more than $1 million a year and eliminate deductions for high earners.

It also would eliminate some tax credits for families that work and save more than the federal poverty level.

The administration is expected on Friday to outline the administration’s plans to provide relief to families with young children, people with disabilities, veterans, low-income workers and the elderly.

The Trump administration has yet to say how much the plan would cost, but it would be paid for by reducing the corporate tax rate, which has fallen to 35 percent from 39.6 percent.

It would also lower taxes on individual income, including those from stocks, bonds, partnerships, partnerships and individual retirement accounts.

Trump, in a speech on Wednesday, said his tax cuts would lead to a $1 trillion increase in the nation´s Gross Domestic Product by the first year of his administration.

The plan would also create an additional $1.2 trillion in tax revenue, Trump said.

The White House estimates the plan will cost about $1,700 for every $1 of income, and the savings would amount to $1 in taxes for every dollar earned.

The nonpartisan Tax Policy Center estimates the plans would add about $2,000 to the cost of the overall tax plan.

The tax plan is expected for a release on Friday at 9 a.m. ET.

What you need to know about the Department of Education’s proposed budget for 2018

In a memo issued Wednesday, the department announced that the 2017-2018 budget would be reduced by $300 million in 2018-2019, a move that will save $5 million on the state budget and $1 million on public school funding.

The memo, dated April 26, also outlines the proposed cuts to education and local government, which includes eliminating a proposed $50 million cut in local funding for the city of Detroit and $35 million in cuts to the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.

Michigan’s budget for the 2018-19 fiscal year is $8.9 billion.

State Treasurer David Orr is the only Republican to vote against the proposed reductions, which are also included in the memo.

State Sen. Chris Shays, D-Detroit, was among several Republicans who voted against the proposal.

He said the budget cuts should be used to cut the budget of the city and not to make up for cuts elsewhere in the state.

“They’re going to have to take a hard look at what they’re doing with local government,” Shays said.

“We’re losing out on $7.5 billion a year.

That’s a huge amount of money.”

The memo states that the state will save about $1.5 million per year on the education level.

This is because of reductions in state funding for education and the state’s cuts in education funding to local governments.

“The proposed reductions to local education funding are necessary to keep the state in a position where we can provide needed education services,” the memo said.

The proposed cuts are a blow to education funding across the state, which has already been impacted by the state losing $1 billion a month in federal funding.

In addition to the cuts to local funding, the memo also recommends that Michigan cut $1 for every $1 it spends on education.

The state will also have to eliminate $1,000 a day in state education funding, which could result in a loss of $1 in state school funding over the next two years, the letter said.

Michigan Governor Rick Snyder has said that the budget is not in jeopardy, but that he needs to consult with the state Senate and Assembly before making the cuts.

Gov.

Snyder said in a statement that he would work with the Legislature and Governor Orr to make adjustments to the proposed budget.

Snyder said the state is “reviewing our state budget, including the proposed state budget cut for local government and public schools, and the proposed State Department of Transportation budget to determine what additional revenue is needed to meet the funding needs of our public schools and communities.”

Gov.

Orr said that he was “deeply disappointed” by the memo, but he said the governor will meet with the Senate and the Assembly to determine how to respond to the memo before making a decision.